How to Use Two-Factor Authentication to Protect Data in Litigation & Discovery

December 1, 2017 Casey C. Sullivan

You’ve been hacked. Whether you’re aware of it or not, it’s almost certain that hackers somewhere have your private, personal information: your name, email addresses, passwords, birth dates, etc. Hackers may have compromised your computer, or your email system, or, more likely, they may have obtained your information from a massive corporate data breach. Every single Yahoo! account has been hacked, for example, totalling more than 3 billion compromised accounts. The Equifax data breach resulted in the theft of personal information of 143 million U.S. consumers. A 2014 breach at eBay exposed another 145 million accounts. The list goes on and on and on.  

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